Wednesday, September 09, 2009

Comments on The Belmont Club
"Run away, run, run, run away"


Paglia would have a different list of errors than I would. For her the errors are tactical, she decries that they impede the attainment of goals. For me the errors are strategic, I decry the goals and take comfort that the Democrats are less efficient than in their dreams.

In tonight's speech Obama achieved an almost perfect disconnection from reality. The man who hired, or was hired by, Rahm Emanuel called for civility while implying crude threats. He gave lip service to traditional concerns about Federal Power but offered not a shred of analysis that would indicate any standard, either Constitutional, practical or moral, that would give rise to any limitation on the Federal government. He offered those who disagree with him absolutely nothing except a vague consideration of a future reform of the tort system, maybe by considering proposals to be examined by some unnamed future committee.

He hoped to match the impact of Mark Antony at Caesar's funeral that resulted in the mob chasing the reactionary conspirators from Rome. He showed the corpse of Kennedy and spoke lovingly of its wounds. He mentioned the Will or at least a message from the departed endorsing their common vision. He delivered nothing. If you remember, in the play Anthony never actually does read the Will he promises.
Here is a young Brando as Antony.


-------
Roderick Reilly,
I am not in favor of term limits. It smacks to much of an admission of incapacity that is incompatible with being a citizen of a sovereign republic. You do not cure an alcohol dependency by asking the bartender to cut you off after 3 drinks but then start serving from another bottle. Otherwise I agree with you and Pascal that we should remember that they are just politicians. Even General Washington had to go to the privy and put his pants on and had a fierce temper but I sure wish he had a man of his caliber again. You are 100% correct about the 17th Amendment needing repeal. That should not simply be something to "even consider" but a priority.

Pascal Fervor,
(who warned against politician worship)
Perhaps Paddy Moynihan was like another sainted Liberal, Fiorello Laguardia who said "I don't make many mistakes but when I do it's a beut." The Little Flower was a Republican and a Protestant Italian with a jewish wife. He couldn't miss.

Sep 10, 2009 - 12:05 pm

3 comments:

Pascal Fervor said...

After I left my comment at BC where I paraphrased the Bard as best I could from memory to help drive home my point, I checked to see if you had commented here. You hadn't yet, but you did have this scene from the movie.

It refreshed my memory; thank you. I wasn't far off.

But here's something I learned I thought I'd share with you. Rhetoric is interesting although I had never really given it much thought. That is despite my having always liked Julius Cæsar and it providing perhaps many of English's best examples of the use of rhetoric.

After today, I realize I may be finally catching on to it. Contrast the order of Mark Antony's words with mine.

The evil men do lives after them, the good they do is oft interred with their bones.

and

The good men do often dies with them whilst the effects of their nefarious deeds live long after.

Despite his denial to such a purpose, when Antony wished to praise Cæsar, the last thing he mentions is the good.

Where one wishes to declaim the doer of mixed deeds, one should mention the bad last.

The listener is more apt to remember the last thing.

Maybe I did it in that order because it made sense to me, and the order is only a 50-50 chance of being proper for the occasion. Or maybe an old dog can learn new tricks.

LifeoftheMind said...

Thank you for joining the conversation. You are correct that Rhetoric is a worthy subject and we would be better off if it was studied formally as befits one of the ancient trivium.

It may interest you to reflect that Winston Churchill was not considered a bright enough boy while at Harrow School for the Classics course that prepped for the Oxbridge major referred to as Greats. Instead he was directed into becoming an English major which proved to be of lasting benefit to both himself and all of us.

Unfortunately I must struggle along with a less rigorously trained mind.

Pascal Fervor said...

After I left my comment at BC where I paraphrased the Bard as best I could from memory to help drive home my point, I checked to see if you had commented here. You hadn't yet, but you did have this scene from the movie.

It refreshed my memory; thank you. I wasn't far off.

But here's something I learned I thought I'd share with you. Rhetoric is interesting although I had never really given it much thought. That is despite my having always liked Julius Cæsar and it providing perhaps many of English's best examples of the use of rhetoric.

After today, I realize I may be finally catching on to it. Contrast the order of Mark Antony's words with mine.

The evil men do lives after them, the good they do is oft interred with their bones.

and

The good men do often dies with them whilst the effects of their nefarious deeds live long after.

Despite his denial to such a purpose, when Antony wished to praise Cæsar, the last thing he mentions is the good.

Where one wishes to declaim the doer of mixed deeds, one should mention the bad last.

The listener is more apt to remember the last thing.

Maybe I did it in that order because it made sense to me, and the order is only a 50-50 chance of being proper for the occasion. Or maybe an old dog can learn new tricks.